Open Course “Strange Sociology: How to Be Strange in Public”

This open course is an experiment in strangeness. It will explore the sociological and psychoanalytic concepts of strangers, strangeness, and the estranged.

We shall ask the following questions: (1) how is strangeness constitutive of the social bond? (2) what privileges and burdens exist among strangers? (3) how does the concept of strangeness fundamentally challenge the discipline of sociology?

We shall attempt to develop a theoretical foundation for “psychoanalytic sociology” by exploring themes within and across the classical and contemporary sociological theory.

Duane Rousselle is a sociological theorist and practicing psychoanalyst. After receiving his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Sociology at the University of New Brunswick (Canada), Duane earned his PhD in Cultural Studies at Trent University (Canada) while simultaneously completing another PhD (ABD) in Philosophy, Media, and Communications at the European Graduate School (Switzerland). In Switzerland, Duane worked as an assistant to the notable social theorists and philosophers Slavoj Zizek and Alain Badiou. His research aims to make interventions into sociology, psychoanalysis, philosophy, and several cognate fields, by bringing them into some relation with topical events.

  • November 18 – December 23
  • Participants will receive a certificate of course completion provided at least four lectures are attended. 
  • The course is taught in English. 
  • Due to restrictions, the number of seats is limited to 25 seats. You must register if you are willing to participate in offline mode. The lectures' recordings will also be available on the SAS YouTube channel

Course Schedule: 

Introduction. Strangers: Foreign and Singular

We recommend you watch the introductory lecture before the open course starts.

  • Lecture 1 (November 18). Estrangement
  • Lecture 2 (November 25). Outsiders and Insiders
  • Lecture 3 (December 2). Strange Sociologists 1: Anomie and Knowledge
  • Lecture 4 (December 9). Strange Sociologists 2: Max Weber and Emile Durkheim
  • Lecture 5 (December 23). Strange Sociology: Concluding Lecture
  1. Berger, Peter. (1963) Excerpt from Invitation to Sociology. As Retrieved on September 10th, 2021 from <http://sociology.morrisville.edu/readings/SOCI101/Berger-Invitation%20to%20Sociology.pdf> 
  2. Collins, Patricia Hill. (1986) “Learning from the Outsider Within: The Sociological Significance of Black Feminist Thought,” Social Problems, vol. 33., no. 6: unpaginated.
  3. Dolar, Mladen. (1991) “‘I Shall Be With You on Your Wedding Night’: Lacan and the Uncanny,” Rendering the Real, Vol. 58: 58-23
  4. Freud, Sigmund. (1919) “The Uncanny,” As Retrieved on September 10th, 2021 from <https://web.mit.edu/allanmc/www/freud1.pdf> 
  5. Goffman, Erving. (1961) “The Moral Career of the Mental Patient,” in Asylum: Essays on the Social Situation of Mental Patients and Other Inmates. Anchor Books. As Retrieved on September 10th, 2021 from <https://dl1.cuni.cz/pluginfile.php/415828/mod_resource/content/3/goffman%20-%20moral%20carrier%20of%20mental%20pacient.pdf> 
  6. Harman, Graham. (2013) “On the Mesh, the Strange Strangers, and Hyperobjects: Morton’s Ecological Ontology,” TARP Architecture Manual. As Retrieved on September 10th, 2021 from <http://dar.aucegypt.edu/handle/10526/3478>
  7. Ibn Khaldun. (2012) The Maqadimah (Franz Rosenthal, Ed, Trans.). [This text is not required reading]. As Retrieved on September 10th, 2021 from <https://asadullahali.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/ibn_khaldun-al_muqaddimah.pdf>
  8. Kristeva, Julia. (1982) Powers of Horror: An Essay on Abjection. Columbia University Press. As Retrieved on September 10th, 2021 from <http://users.clas.ufl.edu/burt/touchyfeelingsmaliciousobjects/Kristevapowersofhorrorabjection.pdf>
  9. Lacan, Jacques. (1962) Selections from The Seminar of Jacques Lacan, Book X: Anxiety. As Retrieved on September 10th, 2021 from <https://www.valas.fr/IMG/pdf/THE-SEMINAR-OF-JACQUES-LACAN-X_l_angoisse.pdf>
  10. Lacan, Jacques. (1962) Selection on “Strange Jouissance” from The Seminar of Jacques Lacan, Book XX. Encore. As Retrieved on September 10th, 2021 from <http://www.lacaninireland.com/web/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/THE-SEMINAR-OF-JACQUES-LACAN-XX.pdf>
  11. Marx, Karl. (1844) “Estranged Labor,” Economic and Philosophical Manuscripts of 1844. As Retrieved on September 10th, 2021 from <https://www.marxists.org/archive/marx/works/1844/manuscripts/labour.htm>
  12. Merton, Robert K. (1972) “Insiders and Outsiders: A Chapter in the Sociology of Knowledge.” American Journal of Sociology, Vol. 78, No. 1.
  13. Merton, Robert K. (1938) “Social Structure and Anomie,” American Sociological Review, Vol. 3., No. 5: 672-82
  14. Miller, Jacques-Alain. (1999) “Did You Say Bizarre?,” Lacan Online. As Retrieved on September 10th, 2021 from <https://www.lacan.com/frameXV2.htm>
  15. Morton, Timothy. (2013) [On “strange strangers”] “A Quake in Being: An Introduction to Hyperobjects,” Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology After the End of the World. As Retrieved on September 10th, 2021 from <http://massivelyinvisibleobjects.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/Hyperobjects.pdf>
  16. Simmel, Georg. (1908) “The Stranger,” As Retrieved on September 10th, 2021 from <https://www.infoamerica.org/documentos_pdf/simmel01.pdf> 
  17. Simmel, Georg. (1902) “Quantitative Aspects of the Group,” As Retrieved on September 10th, 2021 from <https://ia902802.us.archive.org/16/items/sociologyofgeorg030082mbp/sociologyofgeorg030082mbp.pdf>
  18. Weber, Max. (2020) Charisma and Disenchantment: The Vocation Lectures (Paul Reitter & Chad Wellmon, Ed., Trans.).  NYRB Classics.
  19. Zizek, Slavoj. (2019) “The Politics of Alienation and Separation,” Incontinence of the Void. MIT Press: 225-54